The Invisible People

Invisible people can be found, if one takes the time to look, at shopping malls, small towns, cities, hospitals, street corners and many other places.  They are not loud or boastful.  Usually they take seats toward the back of rooms.  Sometimes an invisible person shows up when least expected but slips into a crowd and is not noticed for what he or she does.

You may have missed seeing an invisible person as you rushed rudely toward a department store door to buy that last sale item on the shelve.  The door was not automatic but someone did open it for you.  Then there was the time on the grocery store parking lot when you shoved your empty cart up next to the vehicle next to you without taking it to its proper place.  As you backed out of your parking spot, if you had noticed, the cart was being rolled over to the proper place by a quiet stepping, courteous, caring invisible person.

An invisible person is well liked by others but is very seldom mentioned.  They do not put on a facade or show but instead add a feeling of peace to most situations.  You might not hear from the invisible person for years.  Then one day when you are in need, they are there sitting by your hospital bedside.  They are not afraid to touch your hand or give you a loving warm smile filled with encouragement.  Their voice is usually soft and gentle like a spring breeze in the morning fresh air.

Invisible people are non-judgmental and excellent listeners.  They do not interrupt and are sincerely interested in what you have to say.  Some have high educational degrees while others may have only attended a few years of school.  Their educational degree matters very little because both types of invisible people have so much that they contribute to the world in their own ways.  They are not self seeking.  They do not argue and even though their opinions count, it is not important to them to prove that they are right.  They have a way of carrying themselves with dignity, respect and purpose.  Even in the most stressful of situations, invisible people appear to be at ease.  Their looks and gentle words can sooth the most hurting soul.  They come in all sizes, colors, and backgrounds.  None of this is an issue to them.  They view the world as a gift with each small accomplishment looked upon as a stepping stone in their journey of life.

It is as though they have a special connection with nature.  Critters scurry around them without a care in the world as the invisible person takes a leisurely walk in a park or woods.  They have a special appreciate for color, cloud formations, and natural beauty.  They appear to be at peace with the world and what is around them even on the darkest of days.  They can be content alone or in a crowd but prefer to not be seen.  It is as though they have a sixth sense and know how to share a gentle smile just when you need it the most; that is of course if you choose to slow down long enough not to miss it.

Invisible people are truly humble and understand the meaning of love.  They face fear head on quietly with an attitude of acceptance and peace within.  Invisible people make exceptional friends because they allow you to be your own person and love you just as you are.  So many times though, they go unnoticed because of the chaos and selfishness ways of the world.

Invisible people are really not invisible.  We just need to slow down, appreciate, respect each other and take the time needed to clear our hearts, eyes and ears to allow the invisible people to impact the way we live in society today.  Stop and think about it.  Has your life become so complicated that you missed the opportunity to see and feel the presence of an invisible person today?

An Age to Be Grateful Not Just On Thanksgiving

An Age To Be Grateful Not Just on Thanksgiving

be grateful not just on Thanksgiving

I have noticed some of my friends in the ages around the late 50s to early 60s talking more about being grateful.  In my own life I am doing the same.  There must be something about being more grateful as we age.

It could be we are reflecting more on all the people we have known, the places we have been and the accomplishments and events in our lives.  What a life each of us has had up to this point in time!

There are many people we can be thankful for in our lives.  Think of the people who were your friends at work who you shared lunch time with.  Your colleagues who shared with you, instructed you, who volunteered their time for association meetings as maybe you did too.

Think of your parents who fed and took care of you and sacrificed so your life would be better than theirs.  Think back about other family members like brothers and sisters we shared so much of our lives with, aunts and uncles who gave us presents and cared about us.  Some of these family members are no longer with us. We probably didn’t tell them at the time but we are now grateful for them.

Think of all the places you have been in your life and all the things you have been fortunate enough to experience.   Some of us have traveled to other countries, other states, the nation’s capital, the great Western US, or our National Parks.  Maybe you had the experience of attending a World Series, the Super Bowl, Kentucky Derby, the Olympics, Indy 500, a Broadway Play, or the Petit LeMans.  I am sure you will remember any of those great events and be grateful you made that part of your life.  Maybe it was attending a play at your local high school, your church meetings, or volunteering.  Then maybe you now recognize that life is a journey and simple things like sitting under a shade tree, sitting by a stream,  people watching, or visiting the senior center are all things to be grateful for.

Think of all the things you have accomplished in your life and how grateful you are for them.  These may include raising a family, a happy marriage, your education,  sports or music, a career, a trade or skill you learned really well.  This list could go on but I am betting if you really think about it you are grateful for the opportunity you had to participate in each of these accomplishments.

Now in our everyday life we are becoming more grateful for people we run into like the cashier who smiles and chats with us, the friend who calls and invites us to lunch, a spouse who stays by our side, service workers who wait on our table, clean the hospital and keep this world going.  We can show our appreciation by saying thank you, tipping, holding the door open for people and generally recognizing and showing respect to everyone.

My Thanksgiving challenge to you is As we go through life from this point forward we shall live in the present and recognize every experience, person and place we come across in our lives is something to be grateful for.  All things big and small is to be appreciated.  Showing  gratitude helps too.  This in turn will make us happier and our lives more fulfilled.

So in the spirit of Thanksgiving take some time to think back on all the things you are grateful for.  Maybe this post will jog your memory.

Boomer Living: The Power Of 24 Positive Small Words

There are many sayings about words such as:  A picture is worth a thousand words, actions speak louder than words and etc.  We as boomers have taught and heard powerful words..  We smiled when we heard some small words spoken for the first time by our grandchildren and children before them.

Remember the first time that you heard the word Mama or Da Da uttered from a babies voice.  If you didn’t have children of your own then maybe there was a time that you heard just your name spoken from a little one.  I bet you smiled.  As adults maybe it would be good to go back and focus on small words that create positive reactions for us and others.

When we practice small things like small words it will give us the power to grow and experience what is good in each other.  It is simple and free.

This is a list that I have been using more often.  It is rewarding to see how the words work.

24 Positive Small Words

  1. I love you.
  2. Thank you.
  3. Excuse me.
  4. I care.
  5. You are special.
  6. Good morning.
  7. How are you?
  8. That was very nice.
  9. I understand and admire your courage.
  10. Your smile is like sunshine.
  11. You have such a good listening ear.
  12. The things you do are important.
  13. You did a great job.
  14. We can do this together.
  15. You inspire me by trying.
  16. I appreciate you.
  17. Your sharing makes a difference.
  18. You were missed when you were gone.
  19. You have brought joy into my life.
  20. You can do it.
  21. I noticed your kind deed.
  22. I enjoyed being with you.
  23. You are never alone.
  24. You touched my heart.

Yes, small words can carry power to inspire, bring hope, joy, and encouragement to others.  Then the positive effects come back to us.  I will ask you to join me in a review of small words that we can use to create harmony, peace, and love in our baby boomer journey of life.  You can do it.  It is okay.  We did it as babies.  We taught our children.  Now let’s not forget the importance and the positive power of small words.  It is up to you. It is never too late. What other words can we add and practice that are small but very powerful?   It is not being childlike.  It is really about showing how grown up we really are.  Today might be the day that your life or the life of another will be changed with the power of a kind and considerate small word.