Bucket List Travel


Bucket List Travel Can Improve Your Health, Broaden your Perspective, Even Lead You Into New Careers

If travel is something you long for, I encourage you to do it. Don’t let fears or worries stop you.

Study after study reveals that travel is good for us. It’s good for the body and good for the mind. It lowers stress, strengthens relationships and gives you memories for a lifetime.

Whether you like natural beauty (think rivers, mountains, beaches, waterfalls), cultural experiences (think museums, concert halls, art galleries), or historical sites (think battle grounds or presidential libraries), traveling to these places can enrich and enlarge your life in numerous ways.

Want to be amazed? Fascinated? Awed? Travel somewhere you’ve dreamed about but never actually been. Or, return to someplace wonderful you visited decades back and feel the wonder anew.

My husband, Al, and I began to travel in earnest after we were involved in a serious automobile accident in 2012. That wreck brought home to us how fragile life is. How it can be snatched away in a moment, in the blink of an eye. We decided to stop putting off our travel dreams.

Since then we’ve cruised through the Panama Canal, visited the Taos Pueblo in New Mexico, ridden on the Great Smoky Mountain Railroad, cruised the Mediterranean, driven the Blue Ridge Parkway, and cruised the Mississippi River on an honest-to-goodness steam-powered paddle-wheeler.  Next spring, we’ll cruise the fjords of Norway.

We’ve been pleased to learn that travel is associated with lower rates of heart disease, reduced risk of depression, as well as increased brain development. Yes, our brains can develop even at our “seasoned” ages.

Activities such as touring a museum, finding your way through an unfamiliar town,  walking along the beach have positive mental, physical and social benefits.

Traveling develops new skills. And that increases confidence.

When we travel and meet people from unfamiliar cultures, we may find new ways of looking at life. And that can give us a different perspective on things. We may find ourselves growing intellectually and emotionally.

Because travel often includes walking, we may find ourselves actually getting in better shape. We may even lose weight and gain muscle as we hike, stroll, walk or amble about.

Escaping the every-day, if only for a weekend, can energize and renew us.

Travel is fun.

And you never know where your travels will take you. Al and I have made friends we never would have met otherwise. And we found our travels so amazing, that we began to write about them.

So travel has turned us into authors. We write travel memoirs, filling them with all the wit, wisdom, discoveries and surprises we experience on our journeys.            This year, we’re publishing three books about a trip we took in 2014.

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Cruising the Mediterranean, describes our adventures in  Amsterdam, Venice, Athens, Istanbul and other places. It was named an Amazon #1 best seller in the senior travel category.

Indie Book Reviewers say that the book is “…full of adventure and life and great advice on traveling.”

 

 

FindingOur second book, Finding Ourselves in Venice, Florence, Rome & Barcelona,  was also named a #1 best seller in the senior travel category. In addition, Amazon named it the #1 Hot New Release in Venice travel guides.

In this book, we visit local markets, famous sites, and quiet out-of-the way neighborhoods, staying in Airbnb apartments and using Barcelona’s hop-on hop-off bus to show us around.

Rick Bava, author of In Search of the Baby Boom Generation, said this  about the book: “The beauty of these wonderful places shines through every page.  I recommend it for Baby Boomers and others whose hearts long to travel. You’ll feel like you’re right there…”

And we have a third book, coming out soon: Cruising the Atlantic, Our Epic Journey from Barcelona to Miami.

          I tell you this to underscore how travel can take you places you never dreamed of. Who would have imagined that a wreck caused by a texting driver slamming full speed into us would result in our becoming travel memoir authors sharing our trips with readers around the world?

But there you have it. We’re either writing about a trip, planning a trip, or we’re on a trip, enjoying all the benefits of travel.

At our age, we have the time for travel and we have more money for travel than we had as young adults. Still, we are careful with our travel funds, and try to get the most value for our dollars.

If you have a travel dream, I encourage you to take it.  Travel now, while you can. The Internet can make the trip easier than ever. Nearly every city, state or national park has a website where you can check out tours, lodging, points of interest, even maps of the area.

Do some online exploring, plan with care, fuel your sense of adventure, trigger your imagination, then make your dreams come true.

Al and Sunny Lockwood have traveled by foot, car, rail, air and cruise ship. Everywhere they go, they capture unforgettable moments — Al with his camera and Sunny with her reporter’s notebook.  Their work has been published in magazines and newspapers. This photograph was taken in an Athens coffee shop, when Al and Sunny ducked inside to escape a sudden downpour.  You can contact the Lockwoods at  sunnyandallockwood@gmail.com

 

 

 

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Baby Boomer News

Taking a survey of the news about Baby Boomers, these items come up:

  • The Millennial Generation (born 1980-2000) is overtaking the Baby Boomer Generation (born 1946-1964).  Overtaking in total numbers of people, that is. Millennials get married later and they expect up to 25% will never get married. Millennials are more diverse (non white) than Boomers. Millennials are more picky about their jobs than Boomers were this article says (Yep). Full article here.

    Comment: Well this is no surprise but things will be a little different every year for the next two decades.

  • Will this election (Trump vs Clinton) be the last time Boomer dominate the presidential election. More non Boomers are eligible to vote. More here.

    Comment: Will we have a movie actor or TV reality star running for president in the future? Wait, that’s already happened!)

  • Still a lot of anti Baby Boomer articles I see. Titles like: Who Destroyed the Economy: The Case Against the Baby Boomers and Boomers Are the Zombie Invasion We Feared in the Washington Post, which seems to have the most negative stories about Boomers.

    Comment: These stories don’t make me mad. They are kind of amusing.

  • “The ‘Next Adventure Home’ targets Baby Boomer design preferences” says a focus group is studying what Boomers age 55+ want in a home and community. According to the study, Boomers value amenities such as walking trails and pools when moving to a new community, as well as proximity to shopping, dining and other entertainment. In the house itself, Boomers want plenty of space, including large common rooms with open floor plans and high ceilings. Respondents also said they value natural light, native plants, ample storage space and energy-efficient technology.
    Comment: I don’t see too much news in this study. Welcome to the world of Del Webb Communities.

    Nothing too surprising about us Baby Boomers in the news today.  We just don’t want to be hassled.  -Robert

Boomers Tired All The Time? You May be Suffering from Sleep Apnea

sleep apneaThe baby boomer generation is over 75 million strong. They are active, successful, and live life to the fullest. But as they grow older their medical needs are increasing. Reports are coming in from all over the country that many baby boomers are now suffering from sleep apnea. Below we take a look at sleep apnea’s signs, symptoms, treatment methods, and causes.

The Greek word apnea literally means “without breath” and describes the loss of breath that someone who suffers from the disorder experiences. It is common for people to experience hundreds of apneas a night where the airways are blocked by the soft tissue in the throat collapsing or the brain failing to send the correct signals to the breathing muscles.

The most common form of sleep apnea is known as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). OSA occurs when the throat relaxes and partially blocks the airway causing airway restriction leading to waking up and being out of breath.

Common signs and symptoms of sleep apnea include:

  • Excessive tiredness and sleepiness during the day
  • Waking with a dry mouth and/or sore throat
  • Morning headaches
  • Frequent awaking accompanied with feelings of being out of breath
  • Irritability and erratic mood swings
  • Inability to focus
  • Loss of memory
  • Depression

Sleep apnea is diagnosed using a variety of methods and information such as:

  • Family and Medical History

Healthcare providers will as a series of questions concerning family and personal medical history. They will also want to find out about sleeping patterns and associated symptoms caused by sleep apnea.

Many times people have to acquire the assistance of a family member, spouse, or friend because they are not aware of their behaviors while asleep. Some people keep a sleep diary for 48 hours to gather data that will assist the doctor.

  • Physical exam

The physician will typically examine the neck and throat for causes of blockages such as enlarged and swollen uvula. The uvula is located near the back of the throat and is a piece of soft tissue. Physicians also look at the soft palette which is located at the back of the throat on the roof of the mouth.

  • Sleep study

If a physician needs more information for a proper diagnosis and feels more information is needed they will refer the patient on to a sleep specialist for a sleep study. Sleep studies are typically performed at a sleep center, but may take place in the patient’s home. The most common sleep study test is the polysomnogram.

CPAP Treatment

CPAP stands for Continuous Positive Airflow Pressure and is a treatment device that is used for patients with moderate to severe sleep apnea.  The device is a mask-type machine that fills the air passages with a continuous air stream that works to keep air passages open and clear while sleeping. Many baby boomers who suffer from sleep apnea have found relief using a sleep apnea machine.

Benefits of Using a CPAP

Users of CPAP machines have reported significant improvements in sleep apnea symptoms.  Some of those improvements include:
·    Better quality of life
·    Improved sleeping at night
·    Increased mood happiness
·    Better job performance
·    Enhanced sexual drive
·    Increased alertness when sitting or driving
·    Improved energy
·    More motivation
·    Elimination of snoring

CPAP Side Effects

As with most medical treatment side effects may occur.  Some of the most common side effects experienced by CPAP users include:
·    Dry nasal passages
·    Red marks around the nose
·    Sinus congestion
·    Eye dryness
·    Mouth dryness

If you are a baby boomer and you suspect you or your partner may be suffering from sleep apnea see your health care provider immediately.